Spanish cartoon characters, part two

Here’s the second half of what I started yesterday, a list of the names of cartoon characters in Spanish. As you can see, many of the names are either identical or very similar. If you’re feeling up for a challenge, pop over to Youtube and watch a short episode of your favorite childhood show in Spanish. Eventually, we’ll have to work our way to native Spanish shows and comics– Condorito, MafaldaKalimán, even El chavo del ocho.

And now for a bit of cartoon language trivia for you. One beautiful day out in the Colombian countryside with a group of friends, I once got totally lost in a conversation when they started joking about a dog being named Firulais. I was like, ¿que qué? Unbeknownst to me, it was the dog Spike’s name on the show Rugrats (Aventuras en pañales), one of my favorites way back when, and works like Rover, Spot, Fido, et al., a stock name for dogs in stories or TV shows. Firulais— stick that in your back pocket, and whip it out at just the right moment. You’ll blow minds, I promise.

Donald Duck = Pato Donald, Daisy = Daisy

Goofy = Tribilín/Goofy (When I asked my ex-boyfriend about this, he confessed that he was never sure if Tribilín and Goofy were the same person or two different characters)

The rest of the Disney characters are the same– Mickey (Ratón Mickey), Minnie, and Pluto.

Scooby-Doo = Scooby-Doo

Alvin and the Chipmunks = Alvin y las ardillas (Look, I know a squirrel’s different from a chipmunk and that you’re crying foul because your dictionary says ardilla listada for chipmunk. But, chipmunks aren’t found in Latin America, for one. Secondly, “Alvin and the striped squirrels” just doesn’t have quite the same ring to it. Let’s not get all in a huff and be too legalistic about… these squeaky creatures.)

The Pink Panther = La pantera rosa (Click here to listen to an incredible salsa version of the show’s famous theme song from La 33, a salsa orchestra from Bogotá)

Popeye = Popeye, but the pronunciation is Hispanicized. Three syllables.


Casper the Friendly Ghost = Gasparín el fantasma amistoso

Charlie Brown = Carlitos, Peanuts = Rabanitos, Snoopy = Snoopy

Garfield = Garfield

Anything I missed?  Check out this awesome web page to learn more– my list can’t hold a candle to it. But, mine had pictures, so we’re tied, right? Right.

Oh, and hey– did anyone catch the mistake in the last post? Not my mistake, mind you. Look at what Fred Flintstone says; one letter is off and it completely changes what he said. A very common mistake among natives, I’m sad to say! (Confusing “s” and “z”)

_________________________________________________ Non-natives, what’s your experience with these cartoons in Spanish? Had you heard or seen them before? How have you heard them used? Where? If you’re a native Spanish speaker, anything to correct, clarify, comment on or concur with? 

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15 responses to “Spanish cartoon characters, part two

  1. Thanks for part 2! You can imagine my confused look at the Flinstone comic last time around, especially considering I didn’t know the verb cazar.

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    • Oh, so you caught it? Good for you. Not knowing you or what you look like, I can imagine a confused look, not yours in particular :)

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      • I wouldn’t say that I caught it as much as It just didn’t make sense. I just figured, as I do often, it was it might be some sort of cultural or idiomatic thing that was beyond my book learning and might require further examination… little did I know it was just the wrong verb :)

        And as far as a confused face… it happens to me all too often when I’m reading Spanish. Maybe I ought to make it my profile picture.

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        • Gotcha. Yes, you should never underestimate the possibility that the Spanish is wrong– whether you’re reading it or hearing it. Especially these days with people writing such horrendous chat speak. Here’s an example from one of my former students:

          jajajaja como mande.. pero dime a k horas?? vieja yo x la mañana no creo k este.. dimelo bn.. explicame como va a ser eso.. xk la vdad no c si pueda.. y explicame k pasa en tu ksa porfavor

          Actually, that’s not too bad. It gets much worse, sadly! B’s and V’s get mixed up all the time, especially. Well, now you are one word richer.

          So, are you the Jim from Lang-8? Qué pena lo metida :)

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  2. Aquí les llamamos dibujos animados (cartoons), en la televisión. Bueno, puedo decir que conozco todos los personajes que has mencionado. De hecho reí mucho viendo dibujos animados. También leía muchas revistas con estos personajes. Todavía se puede ver en la televisión, por ejemplo Tom y Jerry, la pantera rosa y otros. Debo confesar que todavía me hacen reir jijijiji
    “condorito” también es super archi conocido (very well known) entre nosotros.

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    • Sí, qué descuido el mío– debería haber dicho cómo se dice “cartoons”. Pero bueno. Que yo sepa, así se llaman en todas partes– dibujos animados. “Animated drawings”– yo me quedo con “cartoons”, la verdad. La palabra en inglés me gusta más, mientras la frase en español, en cambio, suena un poco técnica, no te parece?

      Yo leía revistas de Condorito cuando estaba en Bogotá, y me di cuenta de que era chileno por unas ciertas palabras delatadoras… no recuerdo cuáles, pero de hecho sé una que otra cosa del chilensis, imagínate ;)

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  3. Whaat?! Garfield in spanish?! He is a great favorite of mine. Perhaps I’ll combine your advice in your later post and buy some comics to keep me motivated…These are so wonderful, by the way. I love reading them!

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    • Really? I didn’t know that! I hopped over to ebay and amazon to look for some for you, but they were craaaaazy expensive! Well… someday.

      Thanks for reading, friend! I enjoy writing them… and being read :)

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  4. Pingback: A blog birthday | Vocabat

  5. Aussie-guiri

    gracias para la cancion.. muchos veces he seguido, pero no desde mucho tiempo. :)

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